Types of dating methods in archaeology

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In a stratigraphical context objects closer to the surface are more recent in time relative to items deeper in the ground.

Although relative dating can work well in certain areas, several problems arise.

Cultural seriations are based on typologies, in which artifacts that are numerous across a wide variety of sites and over time, like pottery or stone tools.

Aerial Reconnaissance - The technique of searching for sites and features, both cultural and natural, from the air, often using aerial photography or the human eye.

There are two techniques for dating in archaeological sites: relative and absolute dating.

Relative dating stems from the idea that something is younger or older relative to something else.

More flakes were knocked off from both sides of a stone and there is evidence that the maker had a preconceived notion of the tool's final form.

Acropolis - The "high point" or citadel of an ancient Greek city, like the Acropolis in Athens.

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